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Scholarly Communication

 

If you are interested in finding out more about open access, open data, researcher profiles or new innovations in the scholarly communication landscape, there are plenty of ways to get involved. This list is not exhaustive - if you have a suggestion for something we could add to the page please email us.

Blogs

There is a comprehensive list of blogs about Open Access on the Open Access Directory.

The Unlocking Research blog from the Office of Scholarly Communciation addresses developments and issues in the open access, scholarly communciation and open data space

The Australian Open Access Support Group blog contains commentary on open access issues plus a regular newsletter of open access happenings

The United Kingdom Council of Research Repositories (UKCORR) have a regular blog

The Scholarly Kitchen is a blog covering publishing issues

The London School of Economics and Political Science Impact of Social Sciences blog covers many aspects of scholarly communication

Individual's blogs that cover scholarly communication issues

Timothy Gower is a Cambridge mathematician with a keen interest in The Cost of Knowledge. Gower's weblog

Peter Murray-Rust is a Cambridge chemist - petermr's blog looks at many open issues

Richard Poynder's Open and Shut? blog has covered open access issues for years

Erin C McKiernen writes about Open Science in her blog

Mike Taylor's SV-POW! blog often discusses open scholarship issues

Michael Eisen (Founding editor of PLOS)'s blog - it is NOT junk covers open scholarship amongst other things

Discussion lists

There are many discussion lists that cover areas of scholarly communication:

The American Library Association runs the SCHOLCOMM list which is designed to meet the increasing interest in scholarly communication issues and to allow librarians and other interested parties to exchange opinions, views and news

The Global Open Access List (GOAL) is dedicated to the discussion of Open Access practice and policy-making by the worldwide research community with the aim of enabling concrete, practical steps to be taken to acheive Open Access

The LIBLICENCE Discussion Forum discusses issues related to the licensing of digital information by academic and research libraries

Jisc have a long list of lists that people can join on their website

Movements

There are also groups working in the area of advancing Scholarly Communication.

The Future of Research Communications and e-Scholarship (FORCE11) movement started in 2011 as a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers and research funders that has arisen organically to help facilitate the change toward improved knowledge creation and sharing. The 2012 Manifesto explains the purpose and goals of the movement. 

OpenCon is a group 'Empowering the next generation to advance Open Access Open Education and Open Data'