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Scholarly Communication

 

Software Licensing Workshop

Have you produced your own software? Did you know you can decide how others can reuse and share it? Do you know that there are a range of licences that you could apply to your work that determine how it can be used?

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Social Media Data and Research Ethics: challenges and opportunities

A digital methods workshop organised by Cambridge Digital Humanities

 

Guest speakers:

•             Peter Bath, Professor of Health Informatics, University of Sheffield

•             Lindsay Unwin, Secretary to the University Research Ethics Committee, University of Sheffield

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The Publishing Trap (for librarians)

Dr Jane Secker and Chris Morison, creators of the hugely successful Copyright Card Game, bring their new creation to Cambridge. Looking at the world of scholarly communication this interactive game aims to offer librarians a better understanding of the implications of copyright and other decisions on the publication process. Player will work in teams to move through the different stages of a research career from PhD submission to Professorship, making decisions on a range of scenarios along the way.

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CILIP Training: Moving into Research Support

The participation of library and information professionals in research support is a growing area for the academic library sector but how can librarians get involved if they don't understand the background to this area? Where do libraries and librarians fit within the research lifecycle and what it means to be a researcher in the 21st century?

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In Conversation with the Wellcome Trust - research outputs sharing and management

David Carr and Robert Kiley from the Wellcome Trust are coming to Cambridge to talk with researchers about the Trust’s policy on data, software and materials management and sharing, which was released in July 2017.

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How to Spot a Predatory Publisher (Webinar for Librarians)

'Dear esteemed author…'

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at the problem of predatory publishers using case studies. Attendees will be given tips on how to spot a predatory publisher or conference and the best advice to offer if one of their researchers has been approached.

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Open Access Week: Helping Researchers Publish in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Join us for the fourth in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research in STEM disciplines - from recording observations to editing to peer review.

 

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

Featuring contributions from:

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Open Access Week: Helping Researchers Publish in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Join us for the third in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research - from recording observations to editing to peer review. For the first time, this event focuses exclusively on research taking place in the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences subjects.

 

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

Featuring:

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Popping the Filter Bubble: How facts can help you

So-called “fake news” is everywhere and is having a major impact on daily life from politics to education. The rapid growth of information and the numbers of people who can create it means that we need more sophisticated tools to process the news we receive. Join us to learn about different methods you can use to be your own fact checker and pop your filter bubble.

 

 

Part of the University Festival of Ideas.

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